I know nothing



classycats:

Lately I have been thinking about how people perceive others / what those perceptions mean. I think what people say of others / how they describe others is a lot more indicative of who they are themselves than anything else. It is really interesting to ask others what they think of you or someone else because it can provide insight into who they are / what they value and how their perceptions of others are influenced by those things. Like, the specific adjectives that people use say a lot in particular. When I asked someone to describe me today, one of the words they used, for example, was “nerd.” I def see how they thought of that word (i mean, let’s be real i take my education pretty srsly), but it’s v interesting to me bc they could’ve used a relatively similar adjective such as “smart” ??? which also relays the same message yet has a more positive connotation ??? Interpretation is significant, surely, but the way in which a person describes another person / thing / whatever- that’s where the real info is!!

interesting

Elope with me in private and we’ll set something ablaze,
a trail for the devil to erase

(Source: flowerssandcrownss)

(12,105 plays)
modernshorty:

noooooooo

modernshorty:

noooooooo

thighabetic:

Aziz is putting that marketing major to good use.

(Source: missconceptions)

The brain appears to possess a special area which we might call poetic memory and which records everything that charms or touches us, that makes our lives beautiful … Love begins with a metaphor. Which is to say, love begins at the point when a woman enters her first word into our poetic memory.
—Milan Kundera, The Unbearable Lightness of Being (via whyallcaps)
  • teacher: are there any classes you are struggling with?
  • me: the bourgeois
  • teacher: what
  • me: what
  • karl marx: nice

classycats:

You are who you decide to be

Mindy Kaling speaks on stage during the New Yorker Festival on October 11, 2014

(Source: michaelaconnor)

I asked my ex, now good friend, if she would ever have an open relationship and she said, “No, I don’t think I could do that” then after a pause and a smile, “but what about love affair friendships?” She went on to describe an impenetrable fortress of female friendship, her own group of best mates who’d known each other since school and had supported and loved each other through almost all of their lifetimes. They sounded far more bonded to, and in love with one another, than their respective husbands. It struck me that we don’t have the language to reflect the diversity and breadth of connections we experience. Why is sex the thing we tend to define a relationship by, when in fact it can be simple casual fun without a deep emotional transaction? Why do we say “just friends” when, for some of us, a friendship goes deeper? Can we define a new currency of commitment that celebrates and values this? Instead of having multiple confusing interpretations of the same word, could we have different words? What if we viewed our relationships as a pyramid structure with our primary partner at the top and a host of lovers, friends, spiritual soul mates, colleagues, and acquaintances beneath that?

:-)

FKA Twigs and Robert Pattinson out and about in Brussels on 16 October.

(Source: henrikbluntqvist)